Journal Rankings: Extensions and Robustness Checks

My recent post on a new way of ranking journals using data from Academic Sequitur (which you should check out, by the way!) was more popular than I expected. People pointed out important theory and macro journals I had missed (I’m clearly an applied micro person). So I added more journals. They also pointed out that making top 5 the reference journals may mean that the ranking reflects who is in “the club” with these journals more than anything else. One thing I will do in the future is make a giant matrix of pairwise journal relationships, so if you don’t like using the top 5 as a reference, you can use a different journal. But for now what I did is calculate what % of authors in a journal have only one top 5. This could plausibly make the rating noisier (maybe these people just got lucky), but it should reduce the influence of those who live in the top 5 club (as opposed to guests!).

Finally, someone pointed out that because AER and AEJs are linked, using publication in AER as a metric for the quality of AEJs may be misleading. So I calculated the percent publishing in top 4, excluding the AER. This metric is what the data below are sorted by.

So without any further ado, I give you the expanded and revised rankings! First, the “top 10”.


One thing worth pointing out here is that Quantitative Economics is linked to Econometrica, as is also evident from the high proportion of its authors who have published there. Theoretical Economics and Journal of Economic Theory were not originally in the set of journals I ranked, but they score high both with and without counting the AER. Overall, the rankings get re-shuffled a bit, but given how numerically close the original percentages were, I would call this broadly similar.

Next ten journals:

Next ten:

And here’s the final set:

How do the rankings with and without AER compare? Four journals rise by 5+ spots when AER is excluded: Quantitative Economics, Journal of Mathematical Economics, Review of Economic Dynamics, and Quantitative Marketing and Economics. And four journals fall by 5+ spots: AEJ: Micro, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of International Economics, and Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economics (abbreviated as JAERE above). AEJ: Policy falls by four spots, AEJ: Macro falls by one spot, and AEJ: Applied stays in the same rank.

What if we only count authors who have just one top 5? That changes the rankings much more, actually, with 13 journals rising 5+ spots, including ReStat, JHR, JIE, JUE, and JPubEc. Nine journals fall by 5+ spots, including AEJ: Applied, JEEA, RAND, JEL, and IER. To me, that suggests that who we count matters much more for the ranking than which journals we count.

Bottom line is: stay tuned (you can subscribe to be notified when new posts appear on the bottom right). I plan to play around with these rankings a lot more in the next few months to figure out if/how they can be useful! If you want to play around with the data yourself, the full spreadsheet is here (let me know what you find).

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